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Frequently Asked Questions

What is RVO?

What are the different types of RVO?

What is LUCENTIS® (ranibizumab injection)?

What are the possible side effects of LUCENTIS?

Who should not use LUCENTIS?

How does LUCENTIS work?

How is LUCENTIS given?

What are the goals of treatment with LUCENTIS?

What if I miss a dose of LUCENTIS?

How long will I be treated with LUCENTIS?

Is LUCENTIS a cure for RVO?

Will I get RVO in my other eye?

What should I expect following a LUCENTIS treatment?

How soon can I expect results with LUCENTIS?

What if my insurance changes?

What is RVO?
Veins in your eye—known as retinal veins—are an important part of your eye's normal circulation. They move blood out of your eye toward your heart. A retinal vein occlusion—or RVO—is the blockage of one of these veins. It occurs without warning. RVO can be a serious condition that in some cases can lead to vision loss in the affected eye.

While anyone can get a retinal vein occlusion, it tends to happen to people who are over 50 years old. People with certain medical conditions have an increased risk of RVO. These conditions include high blood pressure, diabetes, glaucoma, and hardening of the arteries. Other factors that may contribute to RVO include smoking, obesity, and oral contraceptives.
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What are the different types of RVO?
There are 2 types of retinal vein occlusion: branch RVO (or BRVO) and central RVO (or CRVO). The type refers to where this blockage occurs in the eye.

In central RVO, the blockage occurs in the central or main retinal vein at the back of the eye.

In branch RVO, the blockage occurs in the inner portion of the eye, where the retinal vein "branches out" into smaller veins.
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What is LUCENTIS® (ranibizumab injection)?
LUCENTIS is a prescription medicine for the treatment of patients with Wet Age-Related Macular Degeneration (wet AMD) and Macular Edema following Retinal Vein Occlusion (RVO).
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What are the possible side effects of LUCENTIS?
Some LUCENTIS patients have serious side effects related to the injection. These include serious infections inside the eye, detached retinas, and cataracts. Other uncommon serious side effects include inflammation inside the eye and increased eye pressure. These side effects can make your vision worse. Some patients have had increased eye pressure before and within 1 hour of an injection. Your eye doctor should check your eye pressure and eye health during the week after your LUCENTIS injection.
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Who should not use LUCENTIS?
You should not be treated with LUCENTIS if you have any eye infections.
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How does LUCENTIS work?
LUCENTIS is designed to block the blood vessel leakage and abnormal blood vessel growth that can lead to vision loss. It does this by targeting harmful proteins. Taken as recommended by your Retina Specialist, LUCENTIS may prevent these proteins from causing more damage.
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How is LUCENTIS given?
LUCENTIS is given as an injection into your eye. Your Retina Specialist will first clean your eye and then numb your eye to limit discomfort before giving you the injection. The recommended dosing schedule that has been tested in clinical studies is 1 injection per month.
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What are the goals of treatment with LUCENTIS?
With LUCENTIS, your Retina Specialist may be able to improve your vision and prevent further vision loss from RVO. Be sure to speak to your Retina Specialist about the specific goals for your treatment.
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What if I miss a dose of LUCENTIS?
Speak to your Retina Specialist about the recommended dosing schedule for your treatment. If you have missed an appointment for a LUCENTIS treatment, call your Retina Specialist to find out when you should schedule an appointment for your next treatment.
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How long will I be treated with LUCENTIS?
The dosing schedule that has been tested in clinical trials and approved by the FDA is 1 injection per month. You should speak to your Retina Specialist about your goals and expectations with LUCENTIS treatment.
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Is LUCENTIS a cure for RVO?
LUCENTIS is not a cure for RVO. Some patients may be able to improve their vision or prevent further vision loss from RVO. However, in some cases the damage from RVO can be so severe that vision loss may be permanent.
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Will I get RVO in my other eye?
Few people will get retinal vein occlusion in both eyes. However, you should talk to your doctor about addressing your risk factors to reduce the chances of RVO occurring again in either eye.
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What should I expect following a LUCENTIS treatment?
After the injection you may have some redness on the white part of your eye at the injection site. You may also see a few specks in your vision. These are common reactions to the injection, and they usually go away within a few days. Contact your Retina Specialist if your eye becomes red, sensitive to light, painful, or has a change in vision.
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How soon can I expect results with LUCENTIS?
You may not notice any immediate changes. Keep in mind that everyone is different, and your results may differ. Your Retina Specialist will regularly monitor your progress to determine the right treatment schedule for you.
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What if my insurance changes?
If your insurance changes, call your Retina Specialist office staff immediately. And if you've been in contact with LUCENTIS® Access Solutions™, make sure you notify them as well.

If you have additional questions, please contact our Nurse Call Center at 1-866-LUCENTIS (1-866-582-3684), Monday-Friday, 9AM-8PM ET.
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Who is LUCENTIS for?

LUCENTIS® (ranibizumab injection) is a prescription medicine for the treatment of patients with macular edema following retinal vein occlusion (RVO).

What important safety information should I know about LUCENTIS?

LUCENTIS is a prescription medication given by injection into the eye, and it has side effects. LUCENTIS is not for everyone. You should not use LUCENTIS if you have an infection in or around the eye or are allergic to LUCENTIS or any of its ingredients.

Some LUCENTIS patients have serious side effects related to the injection. These include serious infections inside the eye, detached retinas, and cataracts. Other uncommon serious side effects include inflammation inside the eye and increased eye pressure. These side effects can make your vision worse. Some patients have had increased eye pressure before and within 1 hour of an injection. Your eye doctor should check your eye pressure and eye health during the week after your LUCENTIS injection.

Uncommonly, LUCENTIS patients have had serious, sometimes fatal, problems related to blood clots, such as heart attacks or strokes.

If your eye becomes red, sensitive to light, or painful, or if you have a change in vision, call or visit your eye doctor right away.

The most common eye-related side effects are increased redness in the white of the eye, eye pain, small specks in vision, and a feeling that something is in the eye. The most common non–eye-related side effects are nose and throat infections, headache, and lung/airway infections.

LUCENTIS is for prescription use only.

For additional safety information, please talk to your doctor and see the LUCENTIS full prescribing information.